Gaz Beadle's fiancée Emma McVey reveals she's been diagnosed with three large holes in her heart in emotional post

GARY Beadle's fiancée Emma McVey has revealed she's been diagnosed with three holes in her heart.

The mum-of-two, 28, needs open heart surgery to fix the major defect and told her fans the uncertainty around her health has caused her anxiety.

The news comes after she told fans earlier this year that she was going to have an angiogram to see if she had a congenital heart defect.

Updating fans on her health issue, she wrote on Instagram: "Long story short, we’ve finally found out I have three large holes in my heart and damaged tissue which is causing my blood to pass through the wrong direction, the right side of my heart is now enlarged and weak, along with high blood pressure in my lungs.

"This has all got a lot worse as they should of been closed when I was a child, unfortunately no one checked my heart even when I had seizures and diagnosed with epilepsy or fainted like it was a hobby 🙃 ."


Emma said doctors were surprised she survived the birth of her second child, and it could have easily been a different outcome if she hadn't have had a cesarean.

She continued: "I’ve been a lot quieter, sometimes snappy and very anxious ❤️ But this is the reason why, because everyday I worry about my babies, and randomly cry thinking what if I go in and they don’t see them again?! Especially with everything going on at the moment 😩.

"Morbid and crazy I know, but it just goes to show you have no idea what people are actually going through and social media really does not show you even half of someone’s life. ❤️."

Gaz backed his wife-to-be to overcome the health scare with a supportive comment.

He wrote: "U will power threw it as u always do… you are the strongest person I know… me and the kids will be by your side the whole time… I can’t guarantee the house will be in 1 piece when u get out of hospital but I’ll try."

WHAT IS AN ANGIOGRAM?

AN angiogram is a test that helps doctors look at your coronary arteries.

Also known as cardiac catheterisation, it's a special type of X-ray, that is carried out with local anaesthetic.

It involves a thin tube being inserted into an artery either in your wrist or groin.

The tube, which is called a catheter, is then directed through your blood vessels to your heart.

A special dye is then passed through the tube and doctors can take a series of X-rays.

The dye works to show up any narrowed areas or blockages in the artery.

The test takes about an hour and is usually carried out as a day case.

Your doctor might recommend the test if you have symptoms of coronary heart disease, including new or worsening chest pain, pain in your jaw, chest, neck or arm, a heart defect you were born with (congenital heart disease), abnormal results from a heart stress test, blood vessel problems or a chest injury, or a heart valve problem that requires surgery.

For more information about heart conditions, visit the British Heart Foundation.

    Source: Read Full Article