Prince Harry haunted by sound of horses’ hooves at mum Diana’s funeral

Prince Harry has told Oprah Winfrey he still remembers the haunting sound of horses' hooves walking slowly down The Mall as he walked behind his late mother's coffin during her funeral.

Harry, 36, made the comments in new Apple TV documentary series The Me You Can't See.

He explained how the funeral was an out of body experience and that he was only able to show a tenth of emotion for his mum than the mourning public were.

Harry said: "For me, the thing I remember the most was the sound of the horses hooves going along the Mall, the red brick road.

"By this point both of us [Harry and William] were in shock.

"It was like I was outside my body and just walking along doing what was expected of me, showing one tenth of the emotion that everyone else was showing."

Poignantly, he added: "This was my mum. You never even met her."

Looking emotional Oprah replied: "As you were speaking I was thinking those of us who admired and loved your mother from afar probably did more processing of her passing than you did."

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Nodding, Harry confirmed: "Without question."

During the five part series, of which Harry is one of a number of contributors, Harry explained how he turned to drink and drugs to mask the pain of losing his mother.

He told Oprah: "One of the feelings that comes up with me always is the helplessness…That happened every single day until the day she died.

"I was willing to drink, I was willing to take drugs, I was willing to try and do the things that made me feel less like I was feeling.

"But I slowly became aware that, okay, I wasn't drinking Monday to Friday, but I would probably drink a week's worth in one day on a Friday or a Saturday night.

"And I would find myself drinking, not because I was enjoying it but because I was trying to mask something."

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"I was willing to drink, I was willing to take drugs, I was willing to try and do the things that made me feel less like I was feeling.

"But I slowly became aware that, okay, I wasn't drinking Monday to Friday, but I would probably drink a week's worth in one day on a Friday or a Saturday night.

"And I would find myself drinking, not because I was enjoying it but because I was trying to mask something."

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