Why Ocean Spray cranberry sauce is canned upside down

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It turns out, cranberry sauce is served best upside down.

Eagle-eyed customers may have noticed that Ocean Spray cranberry sauce cans are actually labeled upside down. Unlike most cans, the rounded edge is on the top, while the sharp edge is on the bottom.

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It turns out, this was done on purpose.

The cans are purposely filled this way to make it easier for customers to get the sauce out as one whole log, Adweek reports. A spokesperson for Ocean Spray spoke with Adweek and explained that the rounded edge at the bottom of the can creates an air bubble.

This is what makes it possible to slide the sauce out all at once and have it retain the shape of the can, which has become a Thanksgiving tradition.

The cans are purposely filled this way to make it easier for customers to get the sauce out as one whole log, (iStock)

In a statement obtained by Adweek, a spokesperson for Ocean Spray said, "Ocean Spray does not see this as a problem that needs solving—by filling sauce this way, it creates space in the bottom of the can to minimize the vacuum effect caused due to the mass of the product. Without it, there’d be a lot more frustrated customers trying to shake or having to spoon it out."

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While customers will be able to get full logs of cranberry sauce this Thanksgiving, it’s going to cost a little extra.

Earlier this week, Fox Business spoke with Tom Hayes, president and CEO of Ocean Spray, about the rising cost of cranberries. According to him, the price increase is due to a variety of factors.

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Hayes explained, "Every single ingredient we purchase at Ocean Spray has been increased. Also, materials like cans, steel cans, they were not available for a large part of this year. And then the ones we’d get are more expensive. It feels like it’s just about everywhere. So from raw materials to labor and transportation, it’s all moving in the wrong direction."

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