Loose Womens Charlene White had to find peace after mums death from cancer

Lorraine: Charlene White opens up on losing her mum to cancer

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Loose Women’s Charlene White tragically lost her mother Dorrett to bowel cancer in 2002 when the presenter was just 21 years old. Charlene, now 43, has reflected on her mother’s death and explained how she has found peace to be a more effective coping strategy than anger.

The presenter explained: “I’ve got friends whose parents have passed and they retain that anger and it’s the anger that drove them to achieve more.

“Whereas with me, at some point in time, I had to become at peace with the fact that she was no longer here.

“Being angry about it, from my personnel, it didn’t achieve anything?”

She went on to add to the Daily Mail: “Anger isn’t something that has driven my career thus far.

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“I think it’s the drive and determination that both of them gave me and that has got me to where I am.”

Charlene had only just begun to get her journalism on track when her mum passed away aged 47, but she was happy that she was able to make Dorrett proud that she was finally pursuing her dreams.

“So before she went, she knew that I was on the path that I had wanted for so long and I feel very blessed that I was able to give that to her before she left.”

Charlene also admitted that hadn’t had a “normal childhood” with a mother that was constantly in and out of hospital, leaving her to step up and look after her siblings.

She spoke to Lorraine Kelly earlier this year about the responsibilities that she faced as a young adult in the wake of her mum’s cancer diagnosis.

“People find it really bizarre when I say [I had] a mum that was in hospital all the time,” she said.

“I mean, I was doing my homework sitting on the bed in Greenwich hospital – [that] was our normal and so we didn’t know any different.” (sic)

She continued: “Me having to take my brother to Primary School before I went to school every morning was my normal, because my mum would be having chemo and my dad had to go to work, so that’s all we ever knew during that period in our life.

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“So I don’t know what it’s like to have a normal childhood in your late teens, early twenties – I don’t know.

“But what I do know is that I don’t want other families to have to go through that and lose a parent as a result of not spotting the signs and not going to their GP,” she concluded.

The Loose Women host also discussed struggling to process her mother’s death whilst pregnant with her first child, who was born in August 1917.

After seeing a therapist and crying away a lot of the pain she was feeling, she described how it felt as though a huge “weight was lifted”.

“So I don’t know what it’s like to have a normal childhood in your late teens, early twenties – I don’t know.

“But what I do know is that I don’t want other families to have to go through that and lose a parent as a result of not spotting the signs and not going to their GP,” she concluded.

The Loose Women host also discussed struggling to process her mother’s death whilst pregnant with her first child, who was born in August 1917.

After seeing a therapist and crying away a lot of the pain she was feeling, she described how it felt as though a huge “weight was lifted”.

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